Learning and Development

At a time like this it is easy to think of your professional development as something to take a back-seat whilst we juggle changes at home and day-to-day work, but CPD is a key factor both in learning outcomes and in staff culture and wellbeing, so you are invited to have a look at some of the ideas and resources here and take some time to reflect on how they can enrich our practice.

This is not about bombarding people with extra tasks, instead, it is a gentle start as we get used to our new ‘normal’ and an opportunity to respond to what you want – whether that’s particular themes or more in-depth research; simply taking a moment to reflect on something or perhaps to come together as a discussion group online.

Relay Issue 33

The latest issue of Relay, the Raleigh Learning Trust Learning and Development Bulletin, can be downloaded here: Relay

The following links provide some further reading to the articles in Relay Issue 33.

Great Teaching Toolkit: Evidence Review and Great Teaching Community

https://www.greatteaching.com/

Instructional Coaching

Ambition Institute: ‘What is instructional coaching?’

Teacher Development Trust: ‘What is instructional coaching?’ (guest post by Dr Gary Jones)

Iris Connect: ‘Coaching for Teachers: What school leaders need to consider’

Matthew Kraft: The Effect of Teacher Coaching on Instruction and Achievement: A Meta-Analysis of the Causal Evidence

Sam Sims: Four reasons instructional coaching is currently the best-evidenced form of CPD

Webinar with international coaching research experts David Blazar and Matthew Kraft ‘Exploring the impact of pedagogical coaching’: https://tdtrust.org/coaching-webinar

Multiple Choice Questions

Stuart Kime – researchEDLoom: https://youtu.be/iFqxgg6b-lI

Dawn Cox blog: https://missdcoxblog.wordpress.com/2020/07/04/differentiation-and-multiple-choice-questions/

Blake Harvard blog: Writing A Better Multiple-Choice Question: What Does Research Indicate? https://theeffortfuleducator.com/2018/09/26/wabmcq/

Daisy Christodoulou blog: https://daisychristodoulou.com/2013/10/research-on-multiple-choice-questions/

Resources

EEF Guidance

The Education Endowment Foundation published its guidance report ‘Improving Behaviour in Schools’ in 2019 which is designed to support senior leaders in primary and secondary schools to make better-informed decisions about their behaviour strategies. It includes a number of practical examples of programmes and approaches to support schools and classrooms where behaviour is generally good as where there are problems.

The report reviews the best available international research, alongside consultation with consultation with teachers and other experts. Those who are familiar with the EEF guidance reports will recognise the summary recommendations and support for implementation.

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/tools/guidance-reports/improving-behaviour-in-schools/

Learn

This course from FutureLearn and developed by the National STEM Learning Centre helps you explore how your behaviour influences your students’, looking at how you control emotional responses and interact with students. It teaches techniques to develop consistent behaviour management, recognise positive behaviour and build trust in your classroom.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/managing-behaviour-for-learning (5 weeks; 3 hours per week)

Listen

Bill Rogers on Behaviour Management

Behaviour management expert, Bill Rogers talks about everything from the fundamental human needs that drive challenging student behaviour in the classroom, to practical strategies that teachers can utilise to deal with this challenging behaviour. (2 hours 14)

https://soundcloud.com/ollielovell/errr-031-bill-rogers-on-behaviour-management

TES Podcast: What every teacher needs to know about the impact of trauma

Essi Viding, professor of Developmental Psychopathology at University College London (UCL) and Eamon McCrory, professor of developmental neuroscience and psychopathology at UCL explain how trauma affects development, how this affects behaviour and what teachers can – and should – do about it. (40 min)

https://www.tes.com/news/what-every-teacher-needs-know-about-impact-trauma

We are in Beta: Behaviour Is Communication

Marie Gentles & Katie L’Aimable – Head and Deputy Headteacher – Hawkswood Primary PRU talk about  what they’ve learned about what some behaviours are communicating and why understanding the root of behaviour is so critical. (36 mins)

https://weareinbeta.substack.com/p/behaviour-is-communication-marie

Research

This week’s reading is the independent review of behaviour management in schools commissioned by the DfE  from behaviour advisor Tom Bennett and published in 2017.

Creating a culture: how school leaders can optimise behaviour (Bennett, 2017)

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/602487/Tom_Bennett_Independent_Review_of_Behaviour_in_Schools.pdf

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias –do you have conscious or unconscious options about the subject matter, do you feel like you already know this information?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent is the information provided familiar?

Is there a bias in the production of the report?

Was the data collection reliable?

What else could the report have looked at?

How much should/can we compare our schools to international schools?

How does the report cover the needs of pupils with SEND?

Has the paper made you re-think school priorities?

Could the information be used and shared with parents?

Do you recognise any of the challenges that impede improvement?

How do you feel about the recommendations given for the DfE and Ofsted?

Has the report made you rethink any aspects of your practice?

Resources

ADHD Foundation

The ADHD Foundation works with individuals, families, doctors, teachers and other agencies to raise awareness and understanding of ADHD, change the negative perception of ADHD into positive and bring about positive change and inclusion within policy and practice. They provide support for schools, GPs, Youth Justice services and other professionals who work with people living with ADHD.

Become and ADHD Friendly School – ADHD Friendly Schools Award holders work in partnership with the ADHD Foundation and make a commitment to say that their school is a safe, nurturing, welcoming and exciting place were learners with ADHD can achieve their potential.

https://www.adhdfoundation.org.uk/training-and-events/adhd-friendly-schools-award/

About ADHD: A Guide for Children

https://www.adhdfoundation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Childrens-Guide_FINAL.pdf

Teaching and Mananging Students with ADHD

https://www.adhdfoundation.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/Teaching-and-Managing-Students_FINAL.pdf

Watch

‘An introduction to ADHD’ – Whole School SEND

This guidance videos has been created in collaboration with Centre for Education and Youth (CfEY), and many other experts within the sector. It aims to develop teachers’ knowledge of SEND and to introduce them to helpful resources and tips for the classroom.

https://youtu.be/3R072ihcqsE (11 mins)

Learn

Understanding ADHD: Current Research and Practice – This course from FutureLearn provides an opportunity to learn about attention deficit hyperactivity disorder including ADHD symptoms, the latest research and ADHD treatment (4 weeks, 2 hours per week)

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/understanding-adhd

Research

This week’s reading is a longitudinal twin study that aims to show how ADHD developmental patterns are associated with young adult functioning.

‘Young adult mental health and functional outcomes among individuals with remitted, persistent and late-onset ADHD in an 18-year prospective cohort of twins’ Agnew-Blais et al (2018)

‘Applying the science of learning in the classroom’ Howard-Jones, Ioannou, Bailey, Prior, Hui Yau and  Jay (2018)

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6098692/pdf/emss-77454.pdf

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias –do you have conscious or unconscious options about the subject matter, do you feel like you already know this information?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent is the information provided familiar?

Is there a bias in the production of the report?

Are there any concepts that are new to you?

Has the paper made you re-think your practice?

Has the paper made you re-think school priorities?

Can you identify any pupils – past or present- who are reflected in the paper’s findings?

How valid are the claims of the paper?

Could the information be used and shared with parents?

What further information would you need to supplement the information in the paper?

Resources

Cognitive load theory: Literature Review

This literature review from the New South Wales Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation provides an overview of cognitive load theory, which is a theory of how human brains learn and store knowledge. Dylan Wiliam has described cognitive load theory as ‘the single most important thing for teachers to know’. Grounded in a robust evidence base, cognitive load theory provides support for explicit models of instruction.

Research that teachers really need to understand (pdf)

Cognitive Load Theory In Practice (pdf)

Cognitive Load Theory and Teaching Strategies

In this article, Emeritus Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of New South Wales , John Sweller describes some classroom teaching strategies that flow from cognitive load theory and helps us think about how we can apply our understanding of how people learn, think and solve problems to classroom instruction.

https://www.teachermagazine.com.au/articles/cognitive-load-theory-teaching-strategies

Watch

‘Teaching so students will never forget’ – Daisy Christodulou

This presentation in the researchEDHome series gives a quick overview of spaced-repetition research, and then focus on some practical advice about how you can integrate a spaced-repetition flashcard system into your teaching & planning and ensure pupils can ‘remember anything, forever’.

https://youtu.be/vZDRSwB9B10 (64 mins)

Books

‘Why Don’t Students Like School?’ Daniel T Willingham

Cognitive scientist Dan Willingham helps teachers improve their practice by explaining how they and their students think and learn, offering easy-to-apply, scientifically-based approaches for engaging students in the classroom.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Why-Dont-Students-Like-School/dp/047059196X

‘Understanding How We Learn: A Visual Guide’ Yana Weinstein, Megan Sumeracki and Oliver Caviglioli

Written by “The Learning Scientists” and fully illustrated by Oliver Caviglioli, this is an accessible guide to implementing effective, research-backed strategies for learning into classroom practice.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Understanding-How-We-Learn-Visual/dp/113856172X/

Research

This week’s reading is a peer-reviewed article from the Chartered College of Teaching’s journal, Impact with a focus on applying the science of learning to the classroom.

‘Applying the science of learning in the classroom’ Howard-Jones, Ioannou, Bailey, Prior, Hui Yau and  Jay (2018)

https://impact.chartered.college/article/howard-jones-applying-science-learning-classroom/

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – do you have conscious or unconscious options about the publication, do you have conscious or unconscious options about the subject matter, do you feel like you already know this information?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent is the information provided familiar?

To what extent do you already use the ‘science of learning’ in your practice?

Is there a bias in the production of the report?

Are there any concepts that are new to you?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Does your school endorse the ideas mentioned?

Could the ‘science of learning’ be further implemented in the practice of your school?

Would pupils benefit from knowledge of cognitive learning strategies?

Is there evidence of gender bias in your school initiatives?

Could the information be used  and shared with parents?

Which of the strategies mentioned have you tried/will you try?

Resources

Focus on… Gender stereotypes

Gender Action – Gender Action is an award programme which promotes and supports a whole-school approach to challenging stereotypes. The ‘Gender stereotyping: Exploring bias and language’ toolkit gives some guidance on how to challenge bias and look at language in your setting and posters to display in your classroom for Early years/Key Stage 1, Primary/Secondary poster and a ‘Challenge language’ poster.

Gender Stereotypes in Early Childhood: A Literature Review (The Fawcett Society, 2019) – This report includes an initial sweep of a diverse body of literature; a review of research that exists relating to learning gender, education in early childhood, parenting, and retail; and evidence relating to the effects of gender stereotyping.

Girls’ Attitudes Survey (2019) – This annual survey offers a snapshot of girls’ and young women’s lives. Every year, Girlguiding asks those aged between 7 and 21, both inside and outside of guiding, how they feel about the specific and emerging pressures facing them today, and what these mean for their happiness, wellbeing and opportunities in life.

Read and listen

Boys Don’t Try? Rethinking Masculinity in Schools

This book by English teachers Matt Pinkett and Mark Roberts examines the research around traditional ideas of masculinity and the negative impact this has on both male and female students. The book explores key topics such as anxiety and achievement, behaviour and bullying, schoolwork and self-esteem.

The ‘Boys Don’t Try?’ podcast featuring the authors and host James Trapp was launched in April 2020 with details available via @BoysDontTryPod.

YouBeYou – A list of books, TV and films recommended by parents and teachers that combat gender stereotypes.

Posters

STEM Role Models Posters – The women featured in these downloadable posters serve as amazing role models in their fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

20 steps to raising children without gender stereotypes from Let Toys Be Toys

Research

This week’s reading is a report from the Institute of Physics ‘Opening Doors: A guide to good practice in countering gender stereotyping in schools’. The report is based on discussions and observations from ten schools in England and gives examples of barriers that schools face, case studies and examples of good practice.

‘Opening Doors: A guide to good practice in countering gender stereotyping in schools’ (2015)

http://www.iop.org/publications/iop/2015/file_66429.pdf

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – do you have conscious or unconscious options that colour how you read the report, do you feel like this information isn’t for you, do you rely on instinct rather than analysis?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent do you recognise the findings of the report?

How can you relate the findings to your everyday practice?

Is there a bias in the production of the report?

Are there any concepts that are new to you?

Can you connect the findings with your everyday practice?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Does your school have a ‘gender champion’? Is this needed more or less in your school?

Is there evidence of gender bias in your school in subject or topic choices?

Is there evidence of gender bias in your school initiatives?

Could the information in the report be used with parents?

Which of the strategies mentioned have you tried/will you try?

Resources

Focus on… Mental Health

Anna Freud Centre

The Anna Freud Centre produced the mental health toolkit for schools to ‘raise awareness amongst school and college staff of the range of validated tools that are available to help measure subjective mental wellbeing amongst the student population’. The toolkit introduces different aspects of mental wellbeing, practice examples, a compendium of instruments and further resources.

https://www.annafreud.org/media/11456/mwb-toolki-final-draft-4.pdf

Alongside the toolkit, The Anna Freud Centre has worked alongside CORC to offer a free Measuring Wellbeing eLearning module which can be accessed here:

https://www.corc.uk.net/eLearning/

Mental Health Foundation

The Mental Health Foundation was established in 1949 and aims to ‘find and address the sources of mental health problems so that people and communities can thrive’. Their website features a wealth of resources including research publications and guides, and information on how you can get involved.

They also offer podcasts for your own wellbeing including mindfulness exercises: https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/podcasts-and-videos/podcasts-for-your-wellbeing

Online courses

This selection of courses from Openlearn offer a variety of insights into mental health and wellbeing at different levels.

Supporting children and young people’s wellbeing (7 hours; Level 2: Intermediate)

Making sense of mental health problems (10 hours; Level 2: Intermediate)

Young people’s wellbeing (16 hours; Level 3: Advanced)

Read and Listen

In her book ‘Stop Talking About Wellbeing’, teacher Kat Howard wants schools to stop tackling wellbeing in a tokenistic way and look at the systems we have that add to workload and unnecessary pressure. Drawing on personal experience, research and the advice of others, Kat sets out strategies to drive change and flip the narrative on wellbeing.

Kat Howard features in an episode of the Naylor’s Natter podcast: ‘Stop talking about wellbeing with Kat Howard’

Research

This week’s reading is a paper in the journal ‘Education Inquiry’ that explores the views of pupils aged between 13 and 19 attending schools in Sweden

‘Perspectives of students with mental health problems on improving the school environment and practice’ (Rosvall, 2019)

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20004508.2019.1687394

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – does the central message conflict with your pre-existing ideas, do you feel mental health isn’t your ‘job’…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent do you recognise the findings of the paper?

How can you relate the findings to your everyday practice?

Is there a bias in the production of the paper?

Are there any ideas that are new to you?

Can you connect the findings with other CPD you have undertaken?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Is there value in ‘student voice’ around mental health’?

How does your school support the physical, social and mental space of pupils?

How much do you consider pupil mental health in your everyday practice?

How far do you think we can relate experiences in a Swedish context to the UK?

What more do you need

How generalizable are the results?

Are the findings relevant to working with younger pupils?

Resources

Focus on… Assessment

Watch and Listen

Professor Dylan Wiliam is Emeritus Professor of Educational Assessment at the Institute of Education, University of London. Wiliam is well known for his influential work on the use of assessment (particularly formative assessment) to support and improve pupil learning. In this short video, originally filmed for Teach First, he explains:

‘What every teacher needs to know about assessment’ (22 mins)

This podcast from Evidence Based Education finds out about the Embedding Formative Assessment programme and the recent Education Endowment Foundation evaluation that pupils in schools following the programme made the equivalent of +2 months’ additional progress.

Trialled and Tested: Embedding Formative Assessment (38 mins)

Online Courses

The following courses are free from Seneca Learning:

Assessment for Teachers – Dawn Cox

The CRAFT of Assessment – Michael Chiles

Books

Dylan Wiliam: Embedded Formative Assessment: (Strategies for Classroom Assessment That Drives Student Engagement and Learning)

Daisy Christodoulou: Making Good Progress?: The future of Assessment for Learning

Michael Chiles: The CRAFT of Assessment

Research

This week’s reading is an article from Impact, the peer-reviewed journal of the Chartered College of Teaching, by deputy headteacher and director of Greenshaw Research School, Phil Stock.

‘Compare the marking: Using comparative judgement to assess student progress at secondary school level’ (Stock, 2017)

https://impact.chartered.college/article/stock-comparative-judgment-assess-progress-secondary-school/

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – have you already looked at comparative judgement/ assessment research, does the method of assessment conflict with your pre-existing ideas, do you already ‘like’ the researchers mentioned…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

Are you familiar with the topic of comparative judgement?

Is there any bias within the article?

The enquiry starts from a secondary English perspective. How is comparative judgement appropriate for different subjects?

The enquiry is from a secondary perspective. How is comparative judgement appropriate for different phases?

How could comparative judgement be used in small school settings?

How reliable are the findings?

How might their trial have been improved?

How could assessment using comparative judgement impact other aspects of your practice?

How can you relate the findings to your everyday practice?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Can the principles of comparative judgement help support pupils with additional learning needs?

Resources

Focus on… Vocabulary Instruction

A broad vocabulary is vital for pupils to access all aspects of the curriculum. From everyday language, to complex terms and subject-specific knowledge, effective vocabulary instruction is everybody’s responsibility.

Closing the Vocabulary Gap – Former English teacher Alex Quigley is an author and National Content Manager at the Educational Endowment Foundation. His book ‘Closing the Vocabulary Gap’ was published in 2018 and explores closing the gap between ‘word poor’ and ‘word rich’ students, providing practical solutions for teachers across the curriculum, incorporating easy-to-use tools, resources and classroom activities.

His website contains several vocabulary articles and resources including this blog of six of his favourite free vocabulary websites that are useful for teachers and students alike:

https://www.theconfidentteacher.com/2018/04/five-useful-vocabulary-websites/

https://www.theconfidentteacher.com/resources/

EEF Literacy Guidance Reports – The Education Endowment Foundation has published several guidance reports for improving literacy which discuss vocabulary instruction:

Preparing for Literacy

Improving Literacy in KS1

Improving Literacy in KS2

Improving Literacy in Secondary Schools

EEF Improving Secondary Science Guidance Report – Recommendation 6 offers evidence and support for the ‘Language of Science: Develop scientific vocabulary and support pupils to read and write about science’. The features of this section are translatable across multiple subjects and stages.

The full guidance report can be downloaded here: https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/tools/guidance-reports/improving-secondary-science/

The Frayer Model – This is a graphic organiser for teaching vocabulary. Students use the tool to define words, explore examples, non-examples and use the word in context.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2AjuMKVboQ&feature=emb_title

Research

This week’s reading is the Oxford University Press report on ‘Why Closing The Word Gap Matters’. The report outlines the results of a survey of 1300 teachers and offers case studies and research from around the world.

‘Why Closing The Word Gap Matters: Oxford Language Report’ (2018)

http://fdslive.oup.com/www.oup.com/oxed/Oxford-Language-Report.PDF?region=uk

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the report
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or subject as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – have you already looked at vocabulary research, does the central message conflict with your pre-existing ideas, do you feel vocabulary isn’t your ‘job’…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent do you recognise the findings of the report?

How can you relate the findings to your everyday practice?

Is there a bias in the production of the report?

Are there any ideas that are new to you?

Can you connect the findings with other CPD you have undertaken?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Can the principles help support pupils with additional learning needs?

How is closing the word gap relevant to your subject?

How is closing the word gap relevant to your phase?

Which of the causes of the word gap are relevant to your pupils?

Which of the strategies mentioned to close the word gap have you tried/will you try?

Resources

Tom Sherrington’s Rosenshine Masterclass – Last week’s research reading was a popular article by Barak Rosenshine outlining 10 research-based principles of instruction with suggestions for the classroom. Tom Sherrington is a former headteacher who has written about Rosenshine’s Principles in practice and delivers workshops and masterclasses internationally. He has recently recorded a screen capture of him talking through the slides he uses for his one-day events.

The five videos and introduction run over two and half hours in total – feel free to dip in or watch them all.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PL_WHYo5KULlfcpKvyf5fXrFEXbA6zroIk&v=gdTlXWYMlIw

Autism Awareness – Here are a series of resources to introduce autism, help support pupils in the classroom and find out more in depth.

Free teaching and school resources from the National Autistic Society and their introductory video, ‘What is Autism?’.

https://www.autism.org.uk/professionals/teachers.aspx

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lk4qs8jGN4U

Autism Education Trust – ‘Good Autism Practice Guidance’: full report, practitioner guide and case studies

https://www.autismeducationtrust.org.uk/shop/good-autism-practice-resources/

Good Practice in Autism Education – for those who want to learn about autism in more depth, this is a free online course with Future Learn. 12 hours over 4 weeks.

https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/autism-education

Research

This week’s reading is a guidance report from the Education Endowment Foundation. The EEF’s guidance reports provide recommendations for teachers based on the best available evidence. The key recommendations are summarised in a single graphic followed by detailed information, case-studies and actionable guidance.

‘Improving Social and Emotional Learning in Primary Schools’ (Education Endowment Foundation, 2019)

https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/public/files/Publications/SEL/EEF_Social_and_Emotional_Learning.pdf

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the article
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or situation as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – do you already like the author, does the central message conflict with your pre-existing ideas…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

What are the benefits to explicit teaching of social and emotional learning?

Can the recommendations help support pupils with additional learning needs?

Can the recommendations help support pupils in a secondary setting?

To what extent do you incorporate aspects of social and emotional learning in your practice?

How could whole-school, whole-class or targeted approaches be appropriate for your setting?

What further evidence would you like to see?

Which of the programmes mentioned would work well in your setting?

How could social and emotional learning be embedded in your own subject area?

A lot of the research cited is from an international context. How far can we relate this to our own context?

Has the guidance made you re-think your practice?

Are there any ideas that are new to you?

Can you identify barriers (school, community, programme) to implementing a social and emotional learning programme?

Resources

researchED Home  – Following the cancellation of researchED conferences, they’re bringing the conferences to your home! Educators from around the world will be delivering video presentations to view for free, at 11:00 every weekday of the summer term. Don’t worry if you aren’t available, the presentations will all be on YouTube afterwards. The full timetable with session information and links to recorded presentations here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Wxr_uWg1L-uLpjaUqQNVPhJLcwj6HJMmH7JkztvrwlU/htmlview

Follow the conversation on Twitter: @researchEdhome #rEDHome

#CPDConnectUp – This is a new project in association with the Teacher Development Trust to use video chat to see friendly faces, talk about education research and take our minds off everything that’s going on. The meetings use Zoom and feature mini presentations and breakout rooms to chat in smaller groups. There are amazing guests lined up (some yet to be announced), anyone can join in and there are a variety of dates and times to try and accommodate as many as possible. All you need to do is register online:

http://tdtrust.org/cpdconnectup

CPD publisher discounts – Stock upon some professional development reading whilst schools are closed.

Crown House is offering a 30% discount (and free postage) on all orders placed via their website during school closures, just use code CPD30 at the checkout.

John Catt has 40% off all online orders to offer light relief for the foreseeable future with code JC40 used on the shopping cart

https://www.crownhouse.co.uk/publications/category/education

https://www.johncattbookshop.com/

Research

This week’s reading is an article by Barack Rosenshine that has gained a lot of attention recently and presents ten research-based principles of instruction, along with suggestions for classroom practice.

‘Principles of Instruction: Research-Based Strategies That All Teachers Should Know.’ (Rosenshine, 2012)

https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/periodicals/Rosenshine.pdf

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the article
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or situation as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – do you already like the author, does the central message conflict with your pre-existing ideas, does it sound like common sense…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

To what extent do you agree or disagree with each of the principles?

How can you relate the principles to your subject or every day practice?

Which of the principles are you most familiar with already?

Are there any ideas that are new to you?

Can you connect the theory behind the principles with other CPD you have undertaken?

Has the article made you re-think your practice?

Can the principles help support pupils with additional learning needs?

Should we look for evidence of all the principles in every lesson and if not, how frequent should they be used?

If you had to choose one to explore, which of the principles would you pick to focus on first and how would you go about it?

Resources

Relay – This is the learning and development bulletin for the Raleigh Learning Trust. It is published half-termly and is aimed at all staff. There is a mixture of articles based on research, educational reports, blogs, organisations and ideas. All the back-issues are published on the Trust website here, including this half term’s issue, 31.

Teacher Tapp – Teacher Tapp is a free survey app for teachers. At 3:30pm, the app buzzes and nearly 8000 teachers answer three quick multiple choice questions about their day or their opinions on teaching. After you answer the questions, you get to see the results from the previous day and you get a piece of CPD in the form of a short article or blog to read. To say thank you, there is the opportunity to win badges and prizes, including book vouchers.

Results from the app are discussed in more detail in their weekly blog and their statistics are increasingly reported in mainstream media and used in policy decisions.

You can find out more at http://www.teachertapp.co.uk  and download the app on the App Store or Google Play.

Teacher Development Trust Interview

A 20 minute interview with Dr Kathy Weston on supporting parents and teachers during COVID19

https://tdtrust.org/dr-kathy-weston-advice-on-supporting-parents-through-home-education

Research

Each week there will be an article for people to read and think about. This week’s is a perspective piece from Impact, the peer-reviewed journal of the Chartered College of Teaching, by former drama and English teacher, Martin Robinson.

‘Curriculum: an offer of what the best might be’ (Robinson, 2018)

https://impact.chartered.college/article/curriculum-an-offer-of-what-the-best-might-be/

Tips for reading:

  • Make a note of any positives, negatives and interesting ideas as you read the article
  • Keep in mind a particular pupil, class or situation as you read and relate the ideas to this
  • Be aware of your own bias – do you already like the author, does the central message conflict with your pre-existing ideas…?

You may find the following questions useful as you read:

What are the key messages Martin is making?

To what extent do you agree with his position?

What do you think ‘essential knowledge’ is?

Who gets to decide what ‘essential’ is?

Is there a limit to what some pupils can learn?

Should some ideas be saved for later?

What background knowledge do pupils need?

How limited is your own knowledge in making these decisions?

What shouldn’t we teach?

Is it possible to successfully personalise a curriculum?

If we focus on pupils’ interests, what will they miss out on?

Does your school culture influence pupils in the same way as your curriculum?

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